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* Key

Courses that fulfill
General Education Requirements:

  • (A-AR) = Analytical - Abstract Reasoning
  • (A-QR) = Analytical - Quantitative
  • (D-D) = Diversity - Domestic
  • (D-I) = Diversity - International
  • (D-L) = Diversity - Language
  • (RCH) = Research
  • (W) = Wellness
  • (WI) = Writing Intensive
  • (AY) = Offered in Alternative Year

ENSU 141 ENVIRONMENT, SOCIETY AND SUSTAINABILITY (4 credits)
This course provides an introduction to environmental sustainability via an integrated approach linking social and natural sciences, with an emphasis on perspectives and methods from social sciences. Specific topics of focus: historical influences on environmental thought, systems thinking, water, food and agriculture, population, waste management, environmental policy, and urban planning.

ENSU 151 ENVIRONMENT, SCIENCE AND SUSTAINABILITY (4 credits)
This course provides an introduction to environmental sustainability via an integrated approach linking social and natural sciences, with an emphasis on perspectives and methods from natural sciences. Topics include: history of environmental sciences, carbon cycling and climate change, renewable/non-renewable resources, pollution and human health, land conservation/restoration, and human-wildlife conflict.

*ENSU 205 AMERICAN LITERATURE AND ECOLOGY (4 credits)
A study of American environmental literature and its imaginative forms in relation to environmental philosophy, including changing ideas of nature and wilderness; representations of space and place; the deep ecology, ecofeminism and environmental justice movements; and the overall relation between human language and value and the non-human world. Attention also to cultural issues of ecology, such as how our ecological understandings affect our sense of identity and our social and economic practices. May include writers such as Thoreau, Abbey, Muir, Snyder, Aldo Leopold, Terry Tempest Williams, Leslie Marmon Silko and Mary Oliver. Also listed as ENG 205. (WI) (AY)

ENSU 210 OUTDOOR TRIP LEADERSHIP (1 credit)
This is a 7-week course that includes a weeklong, student-led field trip over Spring Break (March 18 - 26, 2017). OTL is required for students wishing to receive the Outdoor Education Designation or lead outdoor education trips such as August Wilderness or AWPE courses.  Topics covered include trip planning and preparation, risk management, lesson facilitation, and outdoor skill acquisition. Course fee: $350.

*ENSU 231 JAPANESE CULTURE AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3 credits)
This course entails a general introduction to Japan’s natural environments with an emphasis on the roles that humans, their cultures and societies, have played and continue to play in shaping them. Specific topics include: religion and natures, pop culture & media productions of nature, pollution, technology, and environmental politics. Also listed as JPNS 231. (D-I)

ENSU 310 APPLICATIONS OF GIS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES: POLITICS, BUSINESS, CRIME and URBAN ECOLOGY (4 credits)
This course is designed to provide a foundational knowledge of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and its applications to the Social Sciences. Students in this course will use ArcGIS. The course will cover basic GIS concepts such as mapping, projections, geo-referencing and spatial analysis. It will be taught using a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on, interactive tutorials in the classroom. Students will constantly apply spatial analytical tools to address questions, solve problems and complete independent projects in and outside the classroom. Prerequisite: Sophomore or Junior standing.

ENSU 320 PEDAGOGIES OF PLACE (3 credits)
An introduction to environmental philosophy. Explores the formation of our relationship with the natural world and the roles of education and schooling. Concepts of nature, wilderness, ecology and environmentalism considered and critiqued in light of their functioning as "normative ideals" for a right relationship with the more than human world. Prerequisite: Previous courses in ENSU or consent of the instructor. (AY)

ENSU 322 CLIMATE POLICY (3 credits)
Examines the basic causes of global weirding (e.g., industrialization, electrification, transportation), the key impacts of global weirding (e.g., water scarcity, extreme weather events, rising sea level), mitigation strategies in various sectors (e.g., food production, water systems, and urban planning), and prominent policy solutions (e.g., carbon tax, cap and trade system, feed-in-tariffs, renewable energy portfolios, clean energy research and development). Students will engage in an extended simulation that will investigate the political constraints to adopting various policy solutions. Also listed as POLS 322. (AY)

ENSU 324 ENERGY POLICY (3 credits)
Examine the energy crisis, investigating a broad range of technical and policy alternatives to solve the problem. Students will investigate basic energy science, peak oil, fossil fuel uses, energy efficiency, clean energy, smart grids, and the impacts of solving the energy crisis on our daily lives. Students will engage in a group project aimed at drafting a detailed policy brief assessing a specific energy problem. Also listed as POLS 324. (AY)

ENSU 326 U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL AND NATURAL RESOURCE POLICY (3 credits)
This course introduces the policy process in the context of the United States. Students will examine the major environmental and natural resource policies in the United States and consider challenges and opportunities related to environmental and natural resource policy.

*ENSU 327 URBAN POLITICS, POLICY AND SUSTAINABILITY (3 credits)
By the end of the semester, students will have a solid grounding in the basic theories of urban planning. They also will gain an understanding of the historical development of the city, both globally and in America. In addition, they will learn about evolving structure for regional municipal governing. Finally, they will learn about urbanism's role as a solution to the climate crisis. Prerequisite: POLS 121 or ENSU 141. Also listed as POLS 327. (WI)

ENSU 341 CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS AND ADAPTATION (3 credits)
This course investigates the impacts of climate change on ecosystems including the human systems they support, while exploring the actions that communities are taking to adapt to climate change. Student-centered discussions will center on real-world case studies and a systems-thinking lens through which to view these problems and consider solutions. Prerequisites: ENSU 141 and ENSU 151, or permission of the instructor.

ENSU 343 ECONOMICS OF THE ENVIRONMENT (4 credits)
An examination of the role that economic analysis plays in understanding the environment and the policy frameworks that economics offers in the area of environmental regulation. Topics include an analysis of market failures, the cost-benefit framework and strategies related to environmental policy. A number of applications related to domestic and international environmental issues discussed. Prerequisite: ECON 100. Also listed as ECON 343. (AY)

*ENSU 349 JAPANIMALS (3 credits)
This course focuses on human-animal interactions in Japanese contexts. Emphases will be on the social, cultural and ecological dimensions of these interactions. Through examinations of specific topics, including wildlife conflicts, zoos and pet keeping, students will learn to analyze the multiple contexts that inform inter-species interactions in Japan. Also listed as JPNS 349 and SOAN 349. (D-I)

*ENSU 353 ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION (3 credits)
This course develops an interdisciplinary research “toolkit” with which to approach environmental problem solving. Students learn and practice using methods from the natural or social sciences that are commonly used in environmental careers, as well as interdisciplinary techniques. The course culminates with a student-directed, applied, interdisciplinary project. Prerequisites: ENSU 141 and ENSU 151. (RCH)

*ENSU 363 BIOETHICS (4 credits)
Introduces students to the major theoretical discussions and practical actions in the field of bioethics, with a focus on the implications that these discourses and practices have for a diverse and multicultural world. Includes an introduction to essential bioethical terminology and to a breadth of ethical theories and perspectives. Specific topics covered may include: human subject research, genetic technologies, justice and health care allocation, end of life alternatives, and so on. Prerequisite: Second-year standing or above. Also listed as PHIL 363. (WI)

*ENSU 370 PSYCHOLOGY OF SUSTAINABILITY (3 credits)
We know about the problems with the environment. But how do we fix them? Most issues surrounding sustainability have human behaviors and attitudes at the center. We (humans) over-consume, know something but don’t act on our knowledge, don’t have important information, or simply don’t think that issues of sustainability are important. Psychology is all about human behaviors and thought-processes. The world has problems and psychology has (some) answers. Prerequisite: PSYC 115, PSYC 116 or ENSU 141. Also listed as PSYC 370. (RCH) (AY)

*ENSU 372 SUSTAINABILITY IN THE ANTHROPOCENE (3 credits)
This course engages with a variety of practices, understandings and discourses associated with sustainability, nature, the environment and the Anthropocene in our local community and academic work. The class will discuss ethics of community-based research, collaboratively formulate research questions and approaches for a final project investigating a community sustainability initiative. Also listed as SOAN 372 (D-D, RCH)

*ENSU 376 POLITICAL ECOLOGIES OF EAST ASIA (4 credits) 
Political ecology is a set of scholarly inquiries and approaches that seeks to account for the ways in which power relationships inform, shape, interact with, and are expressed through ecological relationships. This course entails an examination of political ecologies in the East Asia region. The first part of the course introduces students to political ecology approaches to studying ecological systems, and the second part employs case studies from East Asia to examine how power functions in and through ecological systems. Also listed as JPNS 376. (D-I) (AY)

*ENSU 381 FIELD EXPERIENCE/INTERNSHIP (0-1 credit)
Provides a first-hand opportunity to integrate theory gained in the classroom with insights and experience into the workings of an organization gained in a field setting. Available only to declared Environmental Sustainability majors. Students must complete a Field Study application in consultation with their major adviser. Prerequisite: ENSU 141 and/or ENSU 151.

ENSU 486 STUDENT RESEARCH (0-1 credits)

ENSU 488 SENIOR SEMINAR/CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 credits)
Integrates various approaches to Environmental Studies and asks students to review and reflect on what they learned during their major and how it prepares them for future education and/ or careers. Includes major collaborative Integrated Research Project on topic chosen collectively by students, combining experiential and text-based research, that culminates in a public report and presentation.  Prerequisite: Senior standing in the major.